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Woodworking By Buster Header
Recently evolved from "Old Southern Peppermills"*
A member of the woodworking division of CEBCO Smiley Productions
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#17 peppermill
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This is a very special peppermill. It is made of "bodock", also called Osage orange and a few other names. This particular piece of wood came from the second largest bodock tree in the United States. It was on the grounds of the antebellum home, Lochinvar, located in Pontotoc County in northeastern Mississippi. The tree was knocked down by a tornado in 2001. A friend of mine was able to get some pieces of the main trunk of the tree and I was able to obtain a few of those pieces. I have made several peppermills from those pieces. The wood, when worked, is a canary yellow but turns a golden brown with age and UV exposure. The grain looks much like the tree is related to the maple or cherry or both. The wood is extremely hard and it is commonly used for fence posts. It is said that "one bodock post will last longer than three post holes", according to a local newspaper. This is a statement of how hard and bug resistant the wood is when used as fence posts. Even though the wood is so durable when used as fence posts that it is extremely hard to drive a nail into, it worked exceptionally well on the lathe and would shoot paper thin yellow shavings 6" to 8" long when worked with a sharp lathe tool. I have a very limited amount of this wood left for peppermills, so if you are interested in one of these limited edition peppermills, contact us to discuss a possible delivery date.
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